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Change Management

Re-Defining Customer Service

By on February 6, 2014

The definition of great customer service is changing…for the better. The Customer 3D™ approach is taking suppliers’ expectations to a new dimension for their customers. What used to be acceptable in the product-centered world is being expanded by a new, customer-centered mentality. My book, Customer 3D: A New Dimension for Customers, was released today. I am […]

What Needs Changed?

By on October 16, 2013

The title of this post can be interpreted in two ways. First, it can represent the question “What needs to be changed?’ What are the situations or worldviews that are not working and that, therefore, ought to be improved? These are the ideas that we rally together to challenge and to make better. Secondly, it […]

Question Everything

By on October 10, 2012

Customer 3D organizations are re-visiting all of their traditional ways of doing business from the customers’ viewpoint – before customers question it themselves. It’s long overdue.

Go Against the Flow

By on August 15, 2012

The mindset of many futurists, unfortunately, relies on the tendency to see the future as simply a variation on the present. Today, while most product-centered companies are focused on the limited, “predictable” ways of working for their customers, another movement is emerging — Customer 3D™.

Changing Times

By on August 1, 2012

Customer 3D™ is delivering a more customer-centered alternative, in contrast to those organizations who still insist on thinking about customer service as they did years ago. In the 1960's, Bob Dylan wrote and sang, “Your old road is Rapidly agin' (The Times They are A-Changing)” but the message is still true. The future will belong to businesses that are more creative and empathetic than what we have accepted as good enough until now.

Undiscussability

By on July 25, 2012

Most writers and speakers about customer service are focused on simply describing it, rather than paying attention to how to create the leadership characteristics that they want companies to develop. Their work seems to manifest itself mostly in generalizations and to imply that those generalizations will always work for your organization. Beware of what seem to be shortcuts.

Re-Defining Customer Service

By on June 18, 2012

The definition of great customer service is changing…for the better. The Customer 3D™ approach is taking suppliers’ expectations to a new dimension for their customers. What used to be acceptable in the product-centered world is being expanded by a new, customer-centered mentality.

What Needs Changed?

By on May 9, 2012

Customer 3D is a new way of thinking and working for customers worldwide. It is a new dimension of performance for customers that only a few exceptional organizations have figured out. It shows the elements that other organizations can use to operate in this new dimension with more humanity. It is a model that is proactive. It is a strategy in which the first priority is customer success.

Immunity to Change

By on April 20, 2011

Customer-centricity will create a new dimension of success that many companies cannot picture because they are being held back by their assumptions. The journey starts with the realization that success will come when a different organizational culture is in place and that it is worth the effort to change.

What Will Be Different?

By on April 6, 2011

Put your organization on a journey that creates a customer-centered culture. Design a culture that is empowered to “own” the customer in every interaction. Where you are in two years will be dramatically different—and better.

Remastering

By on February 2, 2011

The original customer relationship systems that you developed were acceptable 10-20-30 years ago are becoming obsolete. Remastering, however, is available through new systems that replace mechanistic, product-centric cultures with more organic, customer-centric versions.

Discovering a Better Way for Your Customers

By on February 24, 2010

Customer-centricity will not happen unless your organization is curious about customers and what they will need in the future. Create a culture that is continuously looking for ways to learn more about customers. Don’t become complacent. Be an explorer.

Designing a Better Future

By on July 1, 2009

When I conduct client workshops I often ask participants this question: What could your competitors be developing for your customers right now that you don't currently offer? We know it is impossible to draw an accurate picture of the future. As Yogi Berra said, "It's tough to make predictions, especially about the future." But we continue […]